Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/101053
Citations
Scopus Web of Science® Altmetric
?
?
Type: Journal article
Title: Probing the origin of cosmic rays with extremely high energy neutrinos using the IceCube Observatory
Author: Aartsen, M.
Abbasi, R.
Ackermann, M.
Adams, J.
Aguilar, J.
Ahlers, M.
Altmann, D.
Arguelles, C.
Auffenberg, J.
Bai, X.
Baker, M.
Barwick, S.
Baum, V.
Bay, R.
Beatty, J.
Becker Tjus, J.
Becker, K.
BenZvi, S.
Berghaus, P.
Berley, D.
et al.
Citation: Physical Review. D. Particles, Fields, Gravitation and Cosmology, 2013; 88(11):112008-1-112008-15
Publisher: American Physical Society
Issue Date: 2013
ISSN: 1550-7998
1550-2368
Statement of
Responsibility: 
M. G. Aartsen ... G. C. Hill ... et al. (IceCube Collaboration)
Abstract: We have searched for extremely high energy neutrinos using data taken with the IceCube detector between May 2010 and May 2012. Two neutrino-induced particle shower events with energies around 1 PeV were observed, as reported previously. In this work, we investigate whether these events could originate from cosmogenic neutrinos produced in the interactions of ultrahigh energy cosmic rays with ambient photons while propagating through intergalactic space. Exploiting IceCube’s large exposure for extremely high energy neutrinos and the lack of observed events above 100 PeV, we can rule out the corresponding models at more than 90% confidence level. The model-independent quasidifferential 90% C.L. upper limit, which amounts to E2ϕνe+νμ+ντ=1.2×10−7  GeV cm−2 s−1 sr−1 at 1 EeV, provides the most stringent constraint in the energy range from 10 PeV to 10 EeV. Our observation disfavors strong cosmological evolution of the highest energy cosmic-ray sources such as the Fanaroff-Riley type II class of radio galaxies.
Rights: © 2013 American Physical Society
RMID: 0020134364
DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevD.88.112008
Appears in Collections:Chemistry and Physics publications

Files in This Item:
There are no files associated with this item.


Items in DSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.