Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/102045
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Type: Journal article
Title: A rapid wire-based sampling method for DNA profiling*
Author: Chen, T.
Catcheside, D.
Stephenson, A.
Hefford, C.
Kirkbride, K.
Burgoyne, L.
Citation: Journal of Forensic Sciences, 2012; 57(2):472-477
Publisher: Wiley
Issue Date: 2012
ISSN: 0022-1198
1556-4029
Statement of
Responsibility: 
Tong Chen, David E. A. Catcheside, Alice Stephenson, Chris Hefford, K. Paul Kirkbride, and Leigh A. Burgoyne
Abstract: This paper reports the results of a commission to develop a field deployable rapid short tandem repeat (STR)-based DNA profiling system to enable discrimination between tissues derived from a small number of individuals. Speed was achieved by truncation of sample preparation and field deployability by use of an Agilent 2100 Bioanalyser™. Human blood and tissues were stabbed with heated stainless steel wire and the resulting sample dehydrated with isopropanol prior to direct addition to a PCR. Choice of a polymerase tolerant of tissue residues and cycles of amplification appropriate for the amount of template expected yielded useful profiles with a custom-designed quintuplex primer set suitable for use with the Bioanalyser™. Samples stored on wires remained amplifiable for months, allowing their transportation unrefrigerated from remote locations to a laboratory for analysis using AmpFlSTR® Profiler Plus® without further processing. The field system meets the requirements for discrimination of samples from small sets and retains access to full STR profiling when required.
Keywords: forensic science; biological sampling; DNA profiling; stainless steel wire; disaster victim identification
Description: First published: 28 December 2011
Rights: © 2011 American Academy of Forensic Sciences
RMID: 0030050084
DOI: 10.1111/j.1556-4029.2011.02006.x
Appears in Collections:Animal and Veterinary Sciences publications

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