Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/103416
Type: Thesis
Title: Barriers and facilitators to accessing Autism Spectrum Disorder services: A thematic analysis of the experiences of newly arrived families with culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds in Australia
Author: A'court, Jaimi
Issue Date: 2016
School/Discipline: School of Psychology
Abstract: Families who are newly arrived in Australia and are from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds (CALD) face unique challenges navigating the Australian healthcare system and accessing services. It is well established in the literature that conceptualisations of mental health vary according to cultural background, which presents unique challenges to service providers in countries such as Australia. However there is limited literature on these population’s experiences accessing Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) intervention services in their new country. This qualitative study aimed to explore cultural understandings of ASD among newly arrived families with CALD backgrounds, as well as the barriers and facilitators to accessing ASD intervention services. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 10 healthcare professionals currently practicing across Australia, specializing in ASD services. Thematic analysis identified six main themes including ‘culture impacts definitions and understandings of ASD, ‘culture may impact a range of clinical processes’, ‘being newly arrived to Australia impacts access to ASD services’, ‘interpreters are essential for service delivery when providing ASD services to newly arrived families with CALD backgrounds’, ‘cultural competency is essential for service delivery’ and ‘relationship developing is central to optimising the effectiveness of ASD service provision’. It is anticipated that the results will address gaps in the literature and inform culturally competent practice for healthcare practitioners providing ASD service to clients with CALD backgrounds who are newly arrived in Australia.
Dissertation Note: Thesis (B.Sc.(Hons)) -- University of Adelaide, School of Psychology, 2016
Keywords: Honours; Psychology
Description: This item is only available electronically.
Provenance: This electronic version is made publicly available by the University of Adelaide in accordance with its open access policy for student theses. Copyright in this thesis remains with the author. This thesis may incorporate third party material which has been used by the author pursuant to Fair Dealing exceptions. If you are the author of this thesis and do not wish it to be made publicly available, or you are the owner of any included third party copyright material you wish to be removed from this electronic version, please complete the take down form located at: http://www.adelaide.edu.au/legals
Appears in Collections:School of Psychology

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