Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/104708
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Type: Journal article
Title: A randomised controlled trial of sensory awareness training and additional motor practice for learning scalpel skills in podiatry students
Author: Causby, R.
McDonnell, M.
Reed, L.
Hillier, S.
Citation: BMC Medical Education, 2016; 16(1):309-1-309-9
Publisher: BioMed Central Ltd.
Issue Date: 2016
ISSN: 1472-6920
1472-6920
Statement of
Responsibility: 
Ryan S Causby, Michelle N McDonnell, Lloyd Reed and Susan L Hillier
Abstract: Background: The process of using a scalpel, like all other motor activities, is dependent upon the successful integration of afferent (sensory), cognitive and efferent (motor) processes. During learning of these skills, even if motor practice is carefully monitored there is still an inherent risk involved. It is also possible that this strategy could reinforce high levels of anxiety experienced by the student and affect student self-efficacy, causing detrimental effects on motor learning. An alternative training strategy could be through targeting sensory rather than motor processes. Methods: Second year podiatry students who were about to commence learning scalpel skills were recruited. Participants were randomly allocated into sensory awareness training (Sensory), additional motor practice (Motor) or usual teaching only (Control) groups. Participants were then evaluated on psychological measures (Intrinsic Motivation Inventory) and dexterity measures (Purdue Pegboard, Grooved Pegboard Test and a grip-lift task). Results: A total of 44 participants were included in the study. There were no baseline differences or significant differences between the three groups over time on the Perceived Competence, Effort/ Importance or Pressure/ Tension, psychological measures. All groups showed a significant increase in Perceived Competence over time (F₁,₄₁ = 13.796, p = 0.001). Only one variable for the grip-lift task (Preload Duration for the non-dominant hand) showed a significant difference over time between the groups (F₂,₄₁ = 3.280, p = 0.038), specifically, Motor and Control groups. Conclusions: The use of sensory awareness training, or additional motor practice did not provide a more effective alternative compared with usual teaching. Further research may be warranted using more engaged training, provision of supervision and greater participant numbers.
Keywords: Dexterity; scalpel skills; clinical skills; motor learning; psychomotor testing; Purdue Pegboard; grooved Pegoard test; grip-lift test; Intrinsic Motivation Inventory
Rights: © The Author(s). 2016 Open Access This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated.
RMID: 0030063044
DOI: 10.1186/s12909-016-0817-8
Appears in Collections:Medicine publications

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