Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/107981
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Type: Journal article
Title: Primaries, patronage, and political personalities in South-western Uganda
Author: Vokes, R.
Citation: Journal of Eastern African Studies, 2016; 10(4):660-676
Publisher: Taylor & Francis
Issue Date: 2016
ISSN: 1753-1055
1753-1063
Statement of
Responsibility: 
Richard Vokes
Abstract: This paper is an ethnographic study of the National Resistance Movement Party primaries that took place in the constituency of Rwampara County, Mbarara District, between mid and late 2015. Based on fieldwork carried out during the primary campaigns, it offers a detailed examination of the five candidates’ campaign strategies in the run-up to the polls. It focuses in particular upon the ways in which they all sought to secure votes through making frequent public donations to potential voters. Building upon recent insights from a nascent anthropology of corruption, the paper argues that it is crucial to understand how these gifts were conceptualized, both by their givers and their recipients. It finds that although these donations generally made sense to everyone involved in terms of long-standing cultural logics regarding the ‘proper’ operations of power (amaani), this is not to say that they simply reflected cultural continuities. On the contrary, over the course of the campaigns, both the practices of gifting, and the meanings that attached to these, changed significantly. This helps to explain how and why, in the context of all of this gifting, the donations of one candidate – and one candidate only – came to be seen as illegitimate (i.e. as ‘corrupt’).
Keywords: Patronage; anthropology of corruption; social networks; elections; infrastructure
Rights: © 2017 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group
RMID: 0030063856
DOI: 10.1080/17531055.2016.1278324
Appears in Collections:Anthropology & Development Studies publications

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