Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/110181
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Type: Journal article
Title: The shared and unique genetic relationship between mental well-being, depression and anxiety symptoms and cognitive function in healthy twins
Author: Routledge, K.
Burton, K.
Williams, L.
Harris, A.
Schofield, P.
Clark, C.
Gatt, J.
Citation: Cognition and Emotion, 2017; 31(7):1465-1479
Publisher: Taylor & Francis
Issue Date: 2017
ISSN: 0269-9931
1464-0600
Statement of
Responsibility: 
Kylie M. Routledge, Karen L. O. Burton, Leanne M. Williams, Anthony Harris, Peter R. Schofield, C. Richard Clark and Justine M. Gatt
Abstract: Alterations to cognitive function are often reported with depression and anxiety symptoms, yet few studies have examined the same associations with mental well-being. This study examined the association between mental well-being, depression and anxiety symptoms and cognitive function in 1502 healthy adult monozygotic (MZ) and dizygotic (DZ) twins, and the shared/unique contribution of genetic (G) and environmental (E) variance. Using linear mixed models, mental well-being was positively associated (p < .01) with sustained attention (β = 0.127), inhibition (β = 0.096), cognitive flexibility (β = 0.149), motor coordination (β = 0.114) and working memory (β = 0.156), whereas depression and anxiety symptoms were associated (p < .01) with poorer sustained attention (β = -0.134), inhibition (β = -0.139), cognitive flexibility (β = -0.116) and executive function (β = -0.139). Bivariate twin modelling showed well-being shared a small environmental correlation with motor coordination and a small genetic correlation with working memory. Trivariate twin modelling showed well-being shared a small genetic correlation with inhibition, whereas depression and anxiety symptoms shared a small environmental correlation with inhibition. The remaining variance was mostly driven by unique G and/or E variance. Overall, well-being and depression and anxiety symptoms show both independent and shared relationships with cognitive functions but this is largely attributable to unique G or E variance and small shared G/E variance between pairs of variables.
Keywords: Well-being; attention; executive function; inhibition; mental health; twins
RMID: 0030062720
DOI: 10.1080/02699931.2016.1232242
Grant ID: http://purl.org/au-research/grants/arc/LP0883621
http://purl.org/au-research/grants/nhmrc/628911
http://purl.org/au-research/grants/nhmrc/1062495
http://purl.org/au-research/grants/nhmrc/1037196
http://purl.org/au-research/grants/nhmrc/1055839
Appears in Collections:Psychology publications

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