Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/110276
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Type: Journal article
Title: Nurse-moderated internet-based support for new mothers: non-inferiority, randomized controlled trial
Author: Sawyer, M.
Reece, C.
Bowering, K.
Jeffs, D.
Sawyer, A.
Mittinty, M.
Lynch, J.
Citation: Journal of Medical Internet Research, 2017; 19(7):e258-1-e258-14
Publisher: JMIR Publications
Issue Date: 2017
ISSN: 1438-8871
1438-8871
Statement of
Responsibility: 
Michael G Sawyer, Christy E Reece, Kerrie Bowering, Debra Jeffs, Alyssa CP Sawyer, Murthy Mittinty, John W Lynch
Abstract: Background: Internet-based interventions moderated by community nurses have the potential to improve support offered to new mothers, many of whom now make extensive use of the Internet to obtain information about infant care. However, evidence from population-based randomized controlled trials is lacking. Objective: The aim of this study was to test the non-inferiority of outcomes for mothers and infants who received a clinic-based postnatal health check plus nurse-moderated, Internet-based group support when infants were aged 1-7 months as compared with outcomes for those who received standard care consisting of postnatal home-based support provided by a community nurse. Methods: The design of the study was a pragmatic, preference, non-inferiority randomized control trial. Participants were recruited from mothers contacted for their postnatal health check, which is offered to all mothers in South Australia. Mothers were assigned either (1) on the basis of their preference to clinic+Internet or home-based support groups (n=328), or (2) randomly assigned to clinic+Internet or home-based groups if they declared no strong preference (n=491). The overall response rate was 44.8% (819/1827). The primary outcome was parenting self-competence, as measured by the Parenting Stress Index (PSI) Competence subscale, and the Karitane Parenting Confidence Scale scores. Secondary outcome measures included PSI Isolation, Interpersonal Support Evaluation List-Short Form, Maternal Support Scale, Ages and Stages Questionnaire-Social-Emotional and MacArthur Communicative Development Inventory (MCDI) scores. Assessments were completed offline via self-assessment questionnaires at enrolment (mean child age=4.1 weeks, SD 1.3) and again when infants were aged 9, 15, and 21 months. Results: Generalized estimating equations adjusting for post-randomization baseline imbalances showed that differences in outcomes between mothers in the clinic+Internet and home-based support groups did not exceed the pre-specified margin of inferiority (0.25 of a SD) on any outcome measure at any follow-up assessment, with the exception of MCDI scores assessing children's language development at 21 months for randomized mothers, and PSI Isolation scores at 9 months for preference mothers. Conclusion: Maternal and child outcomes from a clinic-based postnatal health check plus nurse-moderated Internet-based support were not inferior to those achieved by a universal home-based postnatal support program. Postnatal maternal and infant support using the Internet is a promising alternative to home-based universal support programs.
Keywords: Public health informatics; community health services; Internet
Rights: ©Michael G Sawyer, Christy E Reece, Kerrie Bowering, Debra Jeffs, Alyssa C P Sawyer, Murthy Mittinty, John W Lynch. Originally published in the Journal of Medical Internet Research (http://www.jmir.org), 24.07.2017. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work, first published in the Journal of Medical Internet Research, is properly cited. The complete bibliographic information, a link to the original publication on http://www.jmir.org/, as well as this copyright and license information must be included.
RMID: 0030073252
DOI: 10.2196/jmir.6839
Grant ID: http://purl.org/au-research/grants/nhmrc/1016281
http://purl.org/au-research/grants/nhmrc/570120
Appears in Collections:Public Health publications

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