Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/111414
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dc.contributor.authorWhite, L.en
dc.contributor.authorSaltré, F.en
dc.contributor.authorBradshaw, C.en
dc.contributor.authorAustin, J.en
dc.date.issued2018en
dc.identifier.citationBiology letters, 2018; 14(1):1-4en
dc.identifier.issn1744-9561en
dc.identifier.issn1744-957Xen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2440/111414-
dc.description.abstractThe last large marsupial carnivores-the Tasmanian devil (Sarcophilis harrisii) and thylacine (Thylacinus cynocephalus)-went extinct on mainland Australia during the mid-Holocene. Based on the youngest fossil dates (approx. 3500 years before present, BP), these extinctions are often considered synchronous and driven by a common cause. However, many published devil dates have recently been rejected as unreliable, shifting the youngest mainland fossil age to 25 500 years BP and challenging the synchronous-extinction hypothesis. Here we provide 24 and 20 new ages for devils and thylacines, respectively, and collate existing, reliable radiocarbon dates by quality-filtering available records. We use this new dataset to estimate an extinction time for both species by applying the Gaussian-resampled, inverse-weighted McInerney (GRIWM) method. Our new data and analysis definitively support the synchronous-extinction hypothesis, estimating that the mainland devil and thylacine extinctions occurred between 3179 and 3227 years BP.en
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityLauren C. White, Frederik Saltre, Corey J. A. Bradshaw and Jeremy J. Austinen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherRoyal Societyen
dc.rights© 2018 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.en
dc.subjectAMS dating; Holocene; devil; extinction; thylacineen
dc.titleHigh-quality fossil dates support a synchronous, Late Holocene extinction of devils and thylacines in mainland Australiaen
dc.typeJournal articleen
dc.identifier.rmid0030081306en
dc.identifier.doi10.1098/rsbl.2017.0642en
dc.relation.granthttp://purl.org/au-research/grants/arc/DP130104055en
dc.relation.granthttp://purl.org/au-research/grants/arc/DP130103842en
dc.relation.granthttp://purl.org/au-research/grants/arc/FT110100306en
dc.relation.granthttp://purl.org/au-research/grants/arc/FT100100108en
dc.identifier.pubid394165-
pubs.library.collectionEnvironment Institute publicationsen
pubs.library.teamDS10en
pubs.verification-statusVerifieden
pubs.publication-statusPublisheden
dc.identifier.orcidSaltré, F. [0000-0002-5040-3911]en
dc.identifier.orcidBradshaw, C. [0000-0002-5328-7741]en
dc.identifier.orcidAustin, J. [0000-0003-4244-2942]en
Appears in Collections:Environment Institute publications

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