Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/112388
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Type: Journal article
Title: Effect of acute exercise-induced fatigue on maximal rate of heart rate increase during submaximal cycling
Author: Thomson, R.
Rogers, D.
Howe, P.
Buckley, J.
Citation: Research in Sports Medicine, 2016; 24(1):1-15
Publisher: Taylor & Francis
Issue Date: 2016
ISSN: 1543-8627
1543-8635
Statement of
Responsibility: 
Rebecca L. Thomson, Daniel K. Rogers, Peter R.C. Howe and Jonathan D. Buckley
Abstract: Different mathematical models were used to evaluate if the maximal rate of heart rate (HR) increase (rHRI) was related to reductions in exercise performance resulting from acute fatigue. Fourteen triathletes completed testing before and after a 2-h run. rHRI was assessed during 5 min of 100-W cycling and a sigmoidal (rHRIsig) and exponential (rHRIexp) model were applied. Exercise performance was assessed using a 5-min cycling time-trial. The run elicited reductions in time-trial performance (1.34 ± 0.19 to 1.25 ± 0.18 kJ · kg⁻¹, P < 0.001), rHRIsig (2.25 ± 1.0 to 1.14 ± 0.7 beats · min⁻¹ · s⁻¹, P < 0.001) and rHRIexp (3.79 ± 2.07 to 1.98 ± 1.05 beats · min⁻¹ · s⁻¹, P = 0.001), and increased pre-exercise HR (73.0 ± 8.4 to 90.5 ± 11.4 beats · min⁻¹, P < 0.001). Pre-post run difference in time-trial performance was related to difference in rHRIsig (r = 0.58, P = 0.04 and r = 0.75, P = 0.003) but not rHRIexp (r = -0.04, P = 0.9 and r = 0.27, P = 0.4) when controlling for differences in pre-exercise and steady-state HR. rHRIsig was reduced following acute exercise-induced fatigue, and correlated with difference in performance.
Keywords: Heart rate kinetics; athletic performance; exercise-induced fatigue; heart rate response; exercise onset
Rights: © 2015 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group
RMID: 0030064468
DOI: 10.1080/15438627.2015.1076414
Appears in Collections:Physiology publications

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