Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/113319
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dc.contributor.advisorBaune, Bernhard-
dc.contributor.authorEyre, Harris Anthony-
dc.date.issued2016-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2440/113319-
dc.description.abstractThe growing impact of under-recognised and under-treated late-life depression (LLD) stands to negatively affect our societies within the context of an ageing world. LLD is a complex disorder where past studies have explored a narrow set of characteristics in isolation (e.g. clinical, neuropsychological, brain imaging, genomics and proteomics). These isolated analyses have yielded useful findings, and continue to do so, however they are limited given the neurobiological mechanisms of LLD are complex and involve interplay between many brain systems, and can manifest in various investigative modalities. Fortunately, there are novel methods for advancing mental health research. In this dissertation, a variety of novel approaches are used to develop a more comprehensive understanding of the pathophysiology of LLD. This is achieved by exploring discreet studies of peripheral biomarkers (i.e. immunology and genomics), as well as neuroimaging biomarkers (i.e. functional and molecular imaging), and contextualising them against each other. Novel applications of these principles and research tools including machine learning may yield more effective diagnostic, treatment and preventive options for LLD.en
dc.subjectdepressionen
dc.subjectlate-lifeen
dc.subjectold ageen
dc.subjectconvergenceen
dc.subjectmultimodalen
dc.subjectResearch by Publication-
dc.titleNovel approaches to the pathophysiology of late-life depressionen
dc.typeThesesen
dc.contributor.schoolAdelaide Medical Schoolen
dc.provenanceThis electronic version is made publicly available by the University of Adelaide in accordance with its open access policy for student theses. Copyright in this thesis remains with the author. This thesis may incorporate third party material which has been used by the author pursuant to Fair Dealing exceptions. If you are the owner of any included third party copyright material you wish to be removed from this electronic version, please complete the take down form located at: http://www.adelaide.edu.au/legalsen
dc.description.dissertationThesis (Ph.D.) (Research by Publication) -- University of Adelaide, Adelaide Medical School, 2016.en
dc.identifier.doi10.25909/5b3d8feb48000-
Appears in Collections:Research Theses

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