Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/11377
Type: Journal article
Title: Overlapping submicroscopic deletions in Xq28 causing developmental disorders in two unrelated boys
Author: Gedeon, A.
Keinanen, M.
Ades, L.
Kaarianen, H.
Gecz, J.
Baker, E.
Sutherland, G.
Mulley, J.
Citation: American Journal of Human Genetics, 1995; 56(4):907-914
Publisher: The University of Chicago Press
Issue Date: 1995
ISSN: 0002-9297
Abstract: Two unrelated boys are described with delay in development and submicroscopic deletions in Xq28, near FRAXE. Molecular diagnosis to exclude the fragile X (FRAXA) syndrome used the direct probe pfxa3, together with a control probe pS8 (DXS296), against Pstl restriction digests of DNA. Deletions were detected initially by the control probe pS8, which is an anonymous fragment subcloned from YAC 539, within 1 Mb distal to FRAXA. Further molecular analyses determined that the maximum size of the deletion is <100 kb in one boy (MK) and is wholly overlapped by the deletion of up to -200 kb in the other (CB). These deletions lie between the sequences detected by the probe VK21C (DXS296) and a dinucleotide repeat VK18AC (DXS295). The patient MK had only speech delay with otherwise normal development, while patient CB had global developmental delay that included speech delay. Detection of overlapping deletions in these two cases led to speculation that coding sequences of a gene(s) important in language development may be affected. Hybridization of the pS8 and VK21A probes to zooblots revealed cross-species homology. This conservation during evolution suggested that this region contains sequences with functional significance in normal development. The VK21A probe detected a 9.5-kb transcript in placenta and brain and a smaller, 2.5-kb, transcript in other tissues analyzed.
Description: © 1995 by The American Society of Human Genetics.
RMID: 0030004358
Appears in Collections:Genetics publications

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