Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/116544
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Type: Journal article
Title: Degradation of physical and mechanical properties of sandstone subjected to freeze-thaw cycles and chemical erosion
Author: Zhang, J.
Deng, H.
Taheri, A.
Ke, B.
Liu, C.
Yang, X.
Citation: Cold Regions Science and Technology, 2018; 155:37-46
Publisher: Elsevier
Issue Date: 2018
ISSN: 0165-232X
1872-7441
Statement of
Responsibility: 
Jian Zhang, Hongwei Deng, Abbas Taheri, Bo Ke, Chuanju Liu, Xiangru Yang
Abstract: Rocks are often exposed to chemical erosion and extreme temperature changes in cold regions. In this study, the deterioration of sandstone is investigated under rapid freeze-thaw (F-T) cycles. To do so, physical and mechanical properties of sandstone specimens immersed in different chemical solutions were studied after 10, 20 and 30 freeze-thaw cycles. It was found that after applying freeze-thaw cycle specimens' mass, tensile strength and point load strength decrease at different extent while porosity increases. Coupled effects of chemical erosion and freeze-thaw cycles were observed to have a destructive damage on physical and mechanical properties. In this regard, the samples experienced deterioration at different extend when immersed in different chemical solutions. The maximum deterioration was observed for samples being immersed in NaOH solution, followed by that of NaCl solution, H₂SO₄ solution and pure water. Finally, a decay function model is used to further investigate the variations of splitting tensile strength and point load index with freeze-thaw cycles and predict deterioration of rock integrity.
Keywords: Freeze-thaw cycles; chemical erosion; nuclear magnetic resonance; porosity; splitting tensile strength; decay
Rights: © 2018 Published by Elsevier B.V.
RMID: 0030094984
DOI: 10.1016/j.coldregions.2018.07.007
Appears in Collections:Civil and Environmental Engineering publications

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