Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/116634
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dc.contributor.authorChen, Y.en
dc.contributor.authorDeng, A.en
dc.contributor.authorWang, A.en
dc.contributor.authorSun, H.en
dc.date.issued2018en
dc.identifier.citationComputers and Geotechnics, 2018; 104:118-130en
dc.identifier.issn0266-352Xen
dc.identifier.issn1873-7633en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2440/116634-
dc.description.abstractA screw-shaft pile is a bored, cast-in-situ, displacement foundation solution. This study examines the performance of axially loaded screw-shaft piles by laboratory model tests, digital image correlation, and discrete element modelling. The results suggested that the screw section carried a greater vertical load than the corresponding section of the control pile; hence, the screw-shaft pile outperformed the control pile. The screw-shaft pile achieved better performance by influencing a larger volume of sand. The sand around the screw section exhibited enlarged cone-shape shear slips and contributed to gains in the pile capacity.en
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityYadong Chen, An Deng, Anting Wang, Huasheng Sunen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherElsevieren
dc.rights© 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.en
dc.subjectScrew-shaft pile; pile-soil interaction; load transfer; digital image correlation; discrete element methoden
dc.titlePerformance of screw-shaft pile in sand: model test and DEM simulationen
dc.typeJournal articleen
dc.identifier.rmid0030096865en
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.compgeo.2018.08.013en
dc.identifier.pubid435958-
pubs.library.collectionCivil and Environmental Engineering publicationsen
pubs.library.teamDS14en
pubs.verification-statusVerifieden
pubs.publication-statusPublisheden
dc.identifier.orcidDeng, A. [0000-0002-3897-9803]en
Appears in Collections:Civil and Environmental Engineering publications

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