Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/118595
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Type: Book chapter
Title: Gene expression of inflammation markers in depression
Author: Ciobanu, L.G.
Baune, B.
Citation: Inflammation and immunity in depression: basic science and clinical applications, 2018 / Baune, B.T. (ed./s), Ch.11, pp.199-222
Publisher: Academic Press
Publisher Place: London
Issue Date: 2018
ISBN: 9780128110737
Statement of
Responsibility: 
Liliana G. Ciobanu, Bernhard T. Baune
Abstract: Investigating the gene expression signature of depression is a powerful tool to study molecular events leading to the pathophysiology of the disease, with a promising potential for establishing clinically relevant biology-based markers of depression for diagnostic purposes and for tailoring the treatment options for affected individuals. In this chapter, the current state of knowledge and validity on gene expression of inflammation markers of depression will be presented. Collectively, upregulation of the pro-inflammatory cytokines IL1B, IL6, TNF, and INF and transcription factors FN-kB and CREB1 has been observed in the brain and in the periphery, supporting the cytokine hypothesis of depression. However, the results are inconsistent. Furthermore, at the transcriptome level, dysregulation of immune-related genes beyond the commonly studied cytokines was found. Altered markers of inflammation were observed in depression with medical comorbidities versus depression without medical comorbidities and in other psychiatric conditions. Findings on dysregulated gene expression levels of immune genes before and after administration of antidepressants have a potential to be translated into clinical practice as biomarkers of antidepressant treatment response. Although anti-inflammatory therapy for depressed patients has been clinically trialed, the effectiveness of it is not convincing. Gene expression studies investigating the efficacy of anti-inflammatory therapy in humans are yet to be established.
Rights: © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
RMID: 0030099045
DOI: 10.1016/B978-0-12-811073-7.00011-8
Appears in Collections:Medicine publications

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