Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/121113
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Type: Journal article
Title: Direct interaction of whole-inactivated influenza A and pneumococcal vaccines enhances influenza-specific immunity
Author: David, S.
Norton, T.
Tyllis, T.
Wilson, J.
Singleton, E.
Laan, Z.
Davies, J.
Hirst, T.
Comerford, I.
McColl, S.
Paton, J.
Alsharifi, M.
Citation: Nature Microbiology, 2019; 4(8):1316-1327
Publisher: Springer Nature
Issue Date: 2019
ISSN: 2058-5276
2058-5276
Statement of
Responsibility: 
Shannon C. David, Todd Norton, Timona Tyllis, Jasmine J. Wilson, Eve V. Singleton, Zoe Laan, Justin Davies, Timothy R. Hirst, Iain Comerford, Shaun R. McColl, James C. Paton and Mohammed Alsharifi
Abstract: The upper respiratory tract is continuously exposed to a vast array of potentially pathogenic viruses and bacteria. Influenza A virus (IAV) has particular synergism with the commensal bacterium Streptococcus pneumoniae in this niche, and co-infection exacerbates pathogenicity and causes significant mortality. However, it is not known whether this synergism is associated with a direct interaction between the two pathogens. We have previously reported that co-administration of a whole-inactivated IAV vaccine (γ-Flu) with a whole-inactivated pneumococcal vaccine (γ-PN) enhances pneumococcal-specific responses. In this study, we show that mucosal co-administration of γ-Flu and γ-PN similarly augments IAV-specific immunity, particularly tissue-resident memory cell responses in the lung. In addition, our in vitro analysis revealed that S. pneumoniae directly interacts with both γ-Flu and with live IAV, facilitating increased uptake by macrophages as well as increased infection of epithelial cells by IAV. These observations provide an additional explanation for the synergistic pathogenicity of IAV and S. pneumoniae, as well as heralding the prospect of exploiting the phenomenon to develop better vaccine strategies for both pathogens.
Keywords: Immunology; microbiology
Rights: © The Author(s), under exclusive licence to Springer Nature Limited 2019
RMID: 0030116663
DOI: 10.1038/s41564-019-0443-4
Appears in Collections:Environment Institute publications

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