Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/125054
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Type: Journal article
Title: Early adaptation strategies of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Torulaspora delbrueckii to co-inoculation in high sugar grape must-like media
Author: Tondini, F.
Onetto Carvallo, C.
Jiranek, V.
Citation: Food Microbiology, 2020; 90:103463
Publisher: Elsevier
Issue Date: 2020
ISSN: 0740-0020
1095-9998
Statement of
Responsibility: 
Federico Tondini, Cristobal A.Onetto, Vladimir Jiranek
Abstract: Torulaspora delbrueckii and Saccharomyces cerevisiae are yeast species found concurrently in wine. In order to commence fermentation, they adapt to the initial harsh environment, maintaining cellular homeostasis and promoting metabolism. These actions involve an intricate regulation of stress tolerance, growth and metabolic genes. Their phenotypes are influenced by the fermentation environment and physiological state of the cell, but such gene-environment interactions are poorly understood. This study aimed to compare the cell physiology of the two species, through genome-wide analysis of gene expression, coupling Oxford Nanopore MinION and Illumina Hiseq sequencing platforms. The early transcriptional responses to stress, nutrients and cell-to-cell communication were analysed. Particular attention was given to the fundamental gene modulations, leading to an understanding of the physiological changes needed to maintain cellular homeostasis, exit the quiescent state and establish dominance in the fermentation. Our findings suggest the existence of species-specific adaptation strategies in response to growth in a high sugar synthetic grape juice medium.
Keywords: Wine; stress response; transcriptome, co-inoculation; torulaspora delbrueckii
Rights: © 2020 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
RMID: 1000018108
DOI: 10.1016/j.fm.2020.103463
Grant ID: http://purl.org/au-research/grants/arc/IC130100005
Appears in Collections:Microbiology and Immunology publications

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