Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/13093
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Type: Journal article
Title: Regeneration of almond from immature seed cotyledons
Author: Ainsley, P.
Hammerschlag, F.
Bertozzi, T.
Collins, G.
Sedgley, M.
Citation: Plant Cell Tissue and Organ Culture, 2001; 67(3):221-226
Publisher: Kluwer Academic Publ
Issue Date: 2001
ISSN: 0167-6857
Statement of
Responsibility: 
Phillip J. Ainsley, Freddi A. Hammerschlag, Terry Bertozzi, Graham G. Collins and Margaret Sedgley
Abstract: Adventitious shoots were regenerated from immature cotyledons of four almond cultivars (`Ne Plus Ultra', `Nonpareil', `Carmel' and `Parkinson'). Open-pollinated fruit were collected from orchard-grown trees 100–115 days after full bloom. The proximal ends of the cotyledons were excised and the embryonic axes discarded. The effects of different concentrations of thidiazuron (TDZ) and indole-3-butyric acid (IBA) and the presence or absence of light for the first 7 days of culture were determined. Shoot regeneration rates were highest for cotyledons cultured for 8 weeks on Murashige and Skoog (MS) basal medium containing TDZ (10.0 mgrM), followed by 4 weeks on medium without plant growth regulators. Regeneration levels were further improved if cotyledons were maintained in darkness for the first 7 days. IBA (0.5 mgrM) significantly reduced the development of adventitious shoots. The frequency of cotyledons that developed adventitious shoots under the optimum tested conditions for `Ne Plus Ultra', `Nonpareil', `Carmel', and `Parkinson' were 80.0%, 73.3%, 100.0% and 86.7%, respectively.
Keywords: adventitious shoots; indole-3-butyric acid; organogenesis; Prunus dulcis Mill; thidiazuron
Description: The original publication can be found at www.springerlink.com
Rights: © 2001 Kluwer Academic Publishers
RMID: 0020010093
DOI: 10.1023/A:1012700714085
Appears in Collections:Wine Science publications
Environment Institute publications

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