Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/14230
Type: Journal article
Title: New Zealanders in Australia in 2001
Author: Hugo, G.
Citation: New Zealand Population Review, 2004; 30(1&2):61-92
Publisher: Population Association of New Zealand
Issue Date: 2004
ISSN: 0111-199X
Abstract: New Zealand shares a special migration relationship with Australia so that over three per cent of the Australian population were born in New Zealand, have a parent born in New Zealand or are New Zealand citizens. The migration of New Zealanders to Australia in many respects is more like internal migrants within Australia than it is to other international immigrants in the country reflecting both the integration of the labour markets of the two countries and the special category visa for which New Zealanders are eligible. The first part of this paper uses Australian immigration and census data to analyse trends in permanent and non permanent movement from New Zealand to Australia as well as the flow back across the Tasman. The second analyses the characteristics of the migrants. It demonstrates that the flow of New Zealanders into Australia is less selective on the basis of education and occupation than is the flow from Australia to New Zealand. New Zealanders are less concentrated in Australia's major cities than other immigrant groups. They are a relatively young population and have a higher level of labour force participation. However, if age is standardized there are a few differences between the New Zealand-born and the Australia-born populations.
Keywords: Population; demographic surveys; immigrants; New Zealanders; labor market
Description: © Population Association of New Zealand
RMID: 0020042356
Published version: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=anh&AN=18645518
Appears in Collections:Geography, Environment and Population publications
Australian Population and Migration Research Centre publications

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