Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/14561
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Type: Journal article
Title: Cyclosporin monitoring in Australasia: 2002 update of concensus guidelines
Author: Morris, R.
Ilet, K.
Tett, S.
Ray, J.
Fullinfaw, R.
Cooke, R.
Cook, S.
Citation: Therapeutic Drug Monitoring, 2002; 24(6):677-688
Publisher: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins
Issue Date: 2002
ISSN: 0163-4356
1536-3694
Statement of
Responsibility: 
Morris, Raymond G ; Ilett, Kenneth F ; Tett, Susan E ; Ray, John E ; Fullinfaw, Robert O ; Cooke, Russell ; Cook, Stephen
Abstract: Therapeutic drug monitoring of cyclosporin (CsA) has been established as part of the routine clinical treatment of patients following organ transplantation for more than 20 years, and based on contemporary knowledge, many consensus guidelines have been published to assist clinics and laboratories attain optimal strategies for patient care. This article addresses the newer directions in CsA monitoring, with particular reference to the Australasian situation that has evolved since the 1993 Australasian guideline. These changes have included the introduction of alternative assay methodologies, changed CsA formulation from Sandimmun to Neoral throughout Australasia, and alternatives to trough concentration (C0) monitoring, especially 2-hour concentration (C2) monitoring and associated validated dilution protocols to accurately quantitate the higher whole blood CsA concentrations. The revision was prepared following a recent survey of all Australasian CsA-monitoring laboratories where discordant practices were evident.
Keywords: Humans; Diltiazem; Cyclosporine; Drugs, Generic; Drug Monitoring; Immunoassay; Area Under Curve; Reproducibility of Results; Indicator Dilution Techniques; Drug Interactions; Quality Control; Asia; Australia; Guidelines as Topic
RMID: 0020022398
DOI: 10.1097/00007691-200212000-00001
Appears in Collections:Pharmacology publications

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