Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/23105
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Type: Journal article
Title: Expression of the immediate early gene, c-fos, in fetal brain after whole of gestation exposure of pregnant mice to global system for mobile communication microwaves
Author: Finnie, J.
Cai, Z.
Blumbergs, P.
Manavis, J.
Kuchel, T.
Citation: Pathology, 2006; 38(4):333-335
Publisher: Taylor & Francis
Issue Date: 2006
ISSN: 0031-3025
1465-3931
Abstract: AIMS: To study immediate early gene, c-fos, expression as a marker of neural stress after whole of gestation exposure of the fetal mouse brain to mobile telephone-type radiofrequency fields. METHODS: Using a purpose-designed exposure system at 900 MHz, pregnant mice were given a single, far-field, whole body exposure at a specific absorption rate of 4 W/kg for 60 min/day from day 1 to day 19 of gestation. Pregnant control mice were sham-exposed or freely mobile in a cage without further restraint. Immediately prior to parturition on gestational day 19, fetal heads were collected, fixed in 4% paraformaldehyde and paraffin embedded. Any stress response in the brain was detected by c-fos immunohistochemistry in the cerebral cortex, basal ganglia, thalamus, hippocampus, midbrain, cerebellum and medulla. RESULTS: c-fos expression was of limited, but consistent, neuroanatomical distribution and there was no difference in immunoreactivity between exposed and control brains. CONCLUSION: In this animal model, no stress response was detected in the fetal brain using c-fos immunohistochemistry after whole of gestation exposure to mobile telephony.
Keywords: Brain; Animals; Mice, Inbred BALB C; Mice; Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-fos; Immunohistochemistry; Gene Expression Regulation, Developmental; Pregnancy; Genes, fos; Microwaves; Cellular Phone; Female; Stress, Physiological
RMID: 0020061133
DOI: 10.1080/00313020600820864
Appears in Collections:Pathology publications

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