Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/39339
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Type: Journal article
Title: Inside the isomers: the tale of chiral switches
Author: Somogyi, A.
Bochner, F.
Foster, D.
Citation: Australian Prescriber, 2004; 27(2):47-49
Publisher: Australian Prescriber
Issue Date: 2004
ISSN: 0312-8008
1839-3942
Statement of
Responsibility: 
A. Somogyi, F. Bochner and D. Foster
Abstract: Chiral drugs are made up of molecules with the same chemical structure, but different three-dimensional arrangements. Modern manufacturing has enabled the development of products containing a single molecular arrangement. The development of these single enantiomers from chiral drugs is known as chiral switching. Enantiomers of the same drug can have different pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic properties. This may translate into potential health benefits, such as an improved safety margin, if one of the enantiomers has more favourable therapeutic and pharmacokinetic characteristics. However, some chiral switching has resulted in unpredicted toxicity and the withdrawal of the enantiomer from the market or a halt in its development. Drug companies are increasingly using chiral switching as a marketing strategy, but before prescribers switch to single enantiomer drugs they should look for evidence from well-conducted clinical trials that shows the chiral switch is cost-effective and improves the outcomes for patients rather than patents.
Keywords: Enantiomers; drug industry; pharmacokinetics; adverse effects
Description: Reproduced with permission from Australian Prescriber The document attached has been archived with permission from the publisher/copyright holder.
Rights: © 2004 Australian Prescriber
RMID: 0020071934
DOI: 10.18773/austprescr.2004.039
Published version: http://www.australianprescriber.com/magazine/27/2/47/9/
Appears in Collections:Pharmacology publications

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