Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/44090
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Type: Journal article
Title: Boron toxicity tolerance in barley arising from efflux transporter amplification
Author: Sutton, T.
Baumann, U.
Hayes, J.
Collins, N.
Shi, B.
Schnurbusch, T.
Hay, A.
Mayo, G.
Pallotta, M.
Tester, M.
Langridge, P.
Citation: Science, 2007; 318(5855):1446-1449
Publisher: Amer Assoc Advancement Science
Issue Date: 2007
ISSN: 0036-8075
1095-9203
Organisation: Australian Centre for Plant Functional Genomics (ACPFG)
Statement of
Responsibility: 
Tim Sutton, Ute Baumann, Julie Hayes, Nicholas C. Collins, Bu-Jun Shi, Thorsten Schnurbusch, Alison Hay, Gwenda Mayo, Margaret Pallotta, Mark Tester and Peter Langridge
Abstract: Both limiting and toxic soil concentrations of the essential micronutrient boron represent major limitations to crop production worldwide. We identified Bot1, a BOR1 ortholog, as the gene responsible for the superior boron-toxicity tolerance of the Algerian barley landrace Sahara 3771 (Sahara). Bot1 was located at the tolerance locus by high-resolution mapping. Compared to intolerant genotypes, Sahara contains about four times as many Bot1 gene copies, produces substantially more Bot1 transcript, and encodes a Bot1 protein with a higher capacity to provide tolerance in yeast. Bot1 transcript levels identified in barley tissues are consistent with a role in limiting the net entry of boron into the root and in the disposal of boron from leaves via hydathode guttation.
Keywords: Saccharomyces cerevisiae; Hordeum; Plant Roots; Boron Compounds; Boron; Membrane Transport Proteins; Plant Lectins; Plant Proteins; Chromosome Mapping; Transcription, Genetic; Amino Acid Sequence; Base Sequence; Biological Transport; Genes, Plant; Quantitative Trait Loci; Molecular Sequence Data
RMID: 0020073585
DOI: 10.1126/science.1146853
Appears in Collections:Australian Centre for Plant Functional Genomics publications

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