Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/44816
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Type: Journal article
Title: QTL analysis of photosynthesis and water status traits in sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) under greenhouse conditions
Author: Fleury, D.
Fabre, F.
Berrios, E.
Chaarani, G.
Planchon, C.
Sarrafi, A.
Gentzbittel, L.
Citation: Journal of Experimental Botany, 2001; 52(362):1857-1864
Publisher: Oxford Univ Press
Issue Date: 2001
ISSN: 0022-0957
1460-2431
Organisation: Australian Centre for Plant Functional Genomics (ACPFG)
Statement of
Responsibility: 
Delphine Hervé, Françoise Fabre, Ericka Flores Berrios, Nadia Leroux, Ghias Al Chaarani, Claude Planchon, Ahmad Sarrafi and Laurent Gentzbittel
Abstract: The identification of QTL for several physiological traits in sunflower is described. Traits related to photosynthesis (leaf chlorophyll concentration, net photosynthesis and internal CO2 concentration) and water status (stomatal conductance, transpiration, predawn leaf water potential, and relative water content) were evaluated in a population of recombinant inbred lines under greenhouse conditions. Narrow-sense heritabilities were low to average. Using an AFLP linkage map, 19 QTL were detected explaining 8.8–62.9% of the phenotypic variance for each trait. Among these, two major QTL for net photosynthesis were identified on linkage group IX. One QTL co-location was found on linkage group VIII for stomatal movements and water status. Coincident locations for QTL regulating photosynthesis, transpiration and leaf water potential were described on linkage group XIV. These results lead to the first description of the organization of genomic regions related to yield in sunflower.
Keywords: Helianthus annuus; recombinant inbred lines; gas exchange; water potential; chlorophyll content
RMID: 0020077424
DOI: 10.1093/jexbot/52.362.1857
Appears in Collections:Australian Centre for Plant Functional Genomics publications

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