Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/48074
Type: Report
Title: Benefits for Australia of the introduction of an ADR on pedestrian protection
Author: Anderson, R.
Ponte, G.
Searson, D.
Publisher: Centre for Automotive Safety Research
Issue Date: 2008
Series/Report no.: CASR Report Series: CASR048
ISBN: 9781920947507
ISSN: 1449-2237
Organisation: Centre for Automotive Safety Research (CASR)
Statement of
Responsibility: 
RWG Anderson, G Ponte, D Searson
Abstract: This report estimates the benefits to Australia of the adoption of an ADR on pedestrian protection. It compares the sales-weighted performance of the Australian and European new car fleets in relevant pedestrian impact tests, based on test reports from EuroNCAP and ANCAP. These testing programs use very similar tests to those prescribed by the European Directive on pedestrian safety and a proposed Global Technical Regulation. This comparison showed that the pedestrian protection of the new car fleet in Australia is inferior to that of the new car fleet in Europe, and the difference is associated with the introduction of the first phase requirements of the Directive. The benefits to Australia of an ADR on pedestrian protection were calculated, based on benefit calculations that were estimated for a second phase of European regulation due in 2011. Proportional reductions of fatal, serious and slight casualties were applied to Australian casualty data and the associated crash costs. By examining the current performance of the new car fleet, these benefits were disaggregated into benefits that have already accrued since overseas and international regulation was mooted, and that which is yet to be realised through compliance of the new car fleet with a future regulation. An Australian Design Rule conforming to the proposed Global Technical Regulation with the addition of Brake Assist would reduce, in Australia, fatalities by 28, serious injuries by 947 and slight injuries by 1247 each year, with associated savings in crash costs of $385 million per year. Despite recent improvements in the performance of the fleet, around half of these benefits are yet to be realised.
Keywords: Vehicle safety; Pedestrian; Australian Design Rule; Crash test; Benefit calculations
RMID: 0030001438
Appears in Collections:Centre for Automotive Safety Research reports

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