Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/53781
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Type: Journal article
Title: Borderline gestational diabetes mellitus and pregnancy outcomes
Author: Ju, H.
Rumbold, A.
Willson, K.
Crowther, C.
Citation: BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth, 2008; 8(31):1-7
Publisher: BioMed Central Ltd.
Issue Date: 2008
ISSN: 1471-2393
1471-2393
Statement of
Responsibility: 
Hong Ju, Alice R. Rumbold, Kristyn J. Willson and Caroline A. Crowther
Abstract: Background: The impact of borderline gestational diabetes mellitus (BGDM), defined as a positive oral glucose challenge test (OGCT) and normal oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT), on maternal and infant health is unclear. We assessed maternal and infant health outcomes in women with BGDM and compared these to women who had a normal OGCT screen for gestational diabetes. Methods: We compared demographic, obstetric and neonatal outcomes between women participating in the Australian Collaborative Trial of Supplements with antioxidants Vitamin C and Vitamin E to pregnant women for the prevention of pre-eclampsia (ACTS) who had BGDM and who screened negative on OGCT. Results: Women who had BGDM were older (mean difference 1.3 years, [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.3, 2.2], p = 0.01) and more likely to be obese (27.1% vs 14.1%, relative risk (RR) 1.92, [95% CI 1.41, 2.62], p < 0.0001) than women who screened negative on OGCT. The risk of adverse maternal outcome overall was higher (12.9% vs 8.1%, RR 1.59, [95% CI 1.00, 2.52], p = 0.05) in women with BGDM compared with women with a normal OGCT. Women with BGDM were more likely to develop pregnancy induced hypertension (17.9% vs 11.8%, RR 1.51, [95% CI 1.03, 2.20], p = 0.03), have a caesarean for fetal distress (17.1% vs 10.5%, RR 1.63, [95% CI 1.10, 2.41], p = 0.01), and require a longer postnatal hospital stay (mean difference 0.4 day, [95% CI 0.1, 0.7], p = 0.01) than those with a normal glucose tolerance. Infants born to BGDM mothers were more likely to be born preterm (10.7% vs 6.4%, RR 1.68, [95% CI 1.00, 2.80], p = 0.05), have macrosomia (birthweight ≥4.5 kg) (4.3% vs 1.7%, RR 2.53, [95% CI 1.06, 6.03], p = 0.04), be admitted to the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) (6.5% vs 3.0%, RR 2.18, [95% CI 1.09, 4.36], p = 0.03) or the neonatal nursery (40.3% vs 28.4%, RR 1.42, [95% CI 1.14, 1.76], p = 0.002), and have a longer hospital stay (p = 0.001). More infants in the BGDM group had Sarnat stage 2 or 3 neonatal encephalopathy (12.9% vs 7.8%, RR 1.65, [95% CI 1.04, 2.63], p = 0.03). Conclusion: Women with BGDM and their infants had an increased risk of adverse health outcomes compared with women with a negative OGCT. Intervention strategies to reduce the risks for these women and their infants need evaluation. Trial registration: Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN00416244
Keywords: Humans; Diabetes, Gestational; Fetal Distress; Hypertension, Pregnancy-Induced; Infant, Newborn, Diseases; Birth Weight; Glucose Tolerance Test; Apgar Score; Body Mass Index; Pregnancy Outcome; Length of Stay; Risk Factors; Comorbidity; Demography; Gestational Age; Pregnancy; Adult; Infant, Newborn; Australia; Female
RMID: 0020084471
DOI: 10.1186/1471-2393-8-31
Appears in Collections:Obstetrics and Gynaecology publications

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