Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/5534
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Type: Journal article
Title: Brain damage in sheep from penetrating captive bolt stunning
Author: Finnie, J.
Manavis, J.
Blumbergs, P.
Summersides, G.
Citation: Australian Veterinary Journal, 2002; 80(1/2):67-69
Publisher: Australian Veterinary Assn
Issue Date: 2002
ISSN: 0005-0423
1751-0813
Abstract: OBJECTIVE:To determine the severity and distribution of structural changes in the brains of adult sheep stunned by penetrating captive bolt. PROCEDURE:The unconstrained heads of ten, anaesthetised, unhorned, 2-year-old Merino sheep were impacted at the summit of the head with a penetrating captive bolt pistol. Six sheep were ventilated and four received no respiratory support. Two hours after impact, brains from the six ventilated sheep were perfusion-fixed with 4% paraformaldehyde. Sixteen whole, serial coronal sections from each brain were stained with haematoxylin and eosin and immunohistochemically for amyloid precursor protein, a sensitive marker of axonal and neuronal reaction in the brain after trauma. Pathological changes in these brains were then quantified by morphometric analysis. RESULTS:Structural change in all impacted brains was a mixture of focal injury around the wound track and more widely distributed damage in the cerebral hemispheres, cerebellum and brainstem, but varied considerably in severity between individual sheep. All nonventilated sheep died rapidly following respiratory arrest. CONCLUSIONS:After penetrating captive bolt stunning, damage to the central reticular formation, axonal connections, and the cortical mantle is the likely reason for failure of respiratory control and traumatic loss of consciousness.
Keywords: Animals; Sheep; Brain Injuries; Wounds, Gunshot; Euthanasia; Immunohistochemistry; Trauma Severity Indices
RMID: 0020020139
DOI: 10.1111/j.1751-0813.2002.tb12840.x
Appears in Collections:Pathology publications

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