Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/5738
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Type: Journal article
Title: Infant bath seats, drowning and near-drowning
Author: Byard, R.
Donald, T.
Citation: Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health, 2004; 40(5-6):305-307
Publisher: Blackwell Publishing Asia
Issue Date: 2004
ISSN: 1034-4810
1440-1754
Abstract: OBJECTIVE: To investigate the possible role of infant bathtub seats in drowning and near-drowning episodes in infants. METHODS: A review was conducted of the files of the Forensic Science Centre and Child Protection Unit, Women's and Children's Hospital, Adelaide, South Australia, for significant immersion incidents in infants involving bathtub seats from January 1998 to December 2003. RESULTS: A total of six cases of drowning occurred over the 6-year period of the study in children under 2 years of age, including two infants. One of these cases, a 7-month-old boy, had been left unattended for some time in an adult bath in a bathtub seat. He was found drowned, having submerged after slipping down and becoming trapped in the seat. Three near-drowning episodes occurred in children under the age of 2 years, including two boys aged 7 and 8 months, both of whom had been left for some time in adult baths in bath seats. Both were successfully resuscitated and treated in hospital. CONCLUSIONS: These cases demonstrate the vulnerability of infants to immersion incidents when left unattended in bathtubs. Bathtubs are particularly dangerous for infants as the slippery and smooth surfaces predispose to loss of balance and make escape from water difficult. Infant bathtub seats may give parents and child carers a false sense of security leading to infants being left unattended. Unfortunately, however, infants may fall out of, or slip and become trapped in, such seats. Infants and young children cannot be left unsupervised in water, and devices used as bathing aids such as bathtub seats may contribute to immersion incidents.
Keywords: Humans; Drowning; Near Drowning; Baths; Infant Equipment; Infant; Hospitals, Pediatric; Australia; Male
RMID: 0020040435
DOI: 10.1111/j.1440-1754.2004.00375.x
Appears in Collections:Pathology publications

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