Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/58270
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Type: Journal article
Title: Underground friends or enemies: model plants help to unravel direct and indirect effects of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi on plant competition
Author: Facelli, E.
Smith, S.
Facelli, J.
Christophersen, H.
Smith, F.
Citation: New Phytologist, 2010; 185(4):1050-1061
Publisher: Blackwell Publishing Ltd
Issue Date: 2010
ISSN: 0028-646X
1469-8137
Statement of
Responsibility: 
Evelina Facelli, Sally E. Smith, José M. Facelli, Helle M. Christophersen and F. Andrew Smith
Abstract: *We studied the effects of two arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi, singly or together, on the outcome of competition between a host (tomato cultivar, wild-type (WT)) and a surrogate nonhost (rmc, a mycorrhiza-defective mutant of WT) as influenced by the contributions of the direct and AM phosphorus (P) uptake pathways to plant P. *We grew plants singly or in pairs of the same or different genotypes (inoculated or not) in pots containing a small compartment with (32)P-labelled soil accessible to AM fungal hyphae and determined expression of orthophosphate (P(i)) transporter genes involved in both AM and direct P uptake. *Gigaspora margarita increased WT competitive effects on rmc. WT and rmc inoculated with Glomus intraradices both showed growth depressions, which were mitigated when G. margarita was present. Orthophosphate transporter gene expression and (32)P transfer showed that the AM pathway operated in single inoculated WT, but not in rmc. *Effects of AM fungi on plant competition depended on the relative contributions of AM and direct pathways of P uptake. Glomus intraradices reduced the efficiency of direct uptake in both WT and rmc. The two-fungus combination showed that interactions between fungi are important in determining outcomes of plant competition.
Keywords: arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi; direct and indirect effects; model plants; mycorrhiza-defective mutant; mycorrhizal symbiosis; phosphorus (P) uptake; plant competition; tomato mutant
Rights: © The Authors (2010) Journal compilation © New Phytologist (2010)
RMID: 0020095049
DOI: 10.1111/j.1469-8137.2009.03162.x
Appears in Collections:Agriculture, Food and Wine publications

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