Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/5919
Citations
Scopus Web of Science® Altmetric
?
?
Type: Journal article
Title: Brain and blood concentrations of propofol after rapid intravenous injection in sheep, and their relationships to cerebral effects
Author: Ludbrook, G.
Upton, R.
Grant, C.
Gray, E.
Citation: Anaesthesia and Intensive Care, 1996; 24(4):445-452
Publisher: Australian Society of Anaesthetists
Issue Date: 1996
ISSN: 0310-057X
1448-0271
Statement of
Responsibility: 
G.L. Ludbrook, R.N. Upton, C. Grant, E. Gray
Abstract: The time-course of propofol concentrations in the blood and brain following rapid administration of three doses were examined using a sheep preparation and regional pharmacokinetic techniques. These were compared to the time-course of cerebral effects of propofol reported previously. There were marked differences between the time-course of propofol concentrations in arterial blood and the brain, with a close relationship between the time-course of brain concentrations and effects on depth of anaesthesia and CBF. There was evidence that the effect of propofol on cerebral blood flow altered its own rate of elution from the brain. Hysteresis between arterial propofol concentrations and cerebral effects following rapid IV administration therefore appears to have a pharmacokinetic basis, and conventional compartmental pharmacokinetic analysis using blood concentrations alone may fail to accurately predict the time-course of both brain propofol concentrations and depth of anaesthesia.
Keywords: anaesthesia; cerebral blood flow; pharmacology; propofol; pharmacokinetics
Description: Publisher's copy made available with the permission of the publisher © 1996 Australian Society of Anaesthetists
RMID: 0030006108
DOI: 10.1177/0310057X9602400406
Published version: http://www.aaic.net.au/Article.asp?D=1995380
Appears in Collections:Anaesthesia and Intensive Care publications

Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormat 
hdl_5919.pdf239.13 kBPublisher's PDFView/Open


Items in DSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.