Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/5941
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Type: Journal article
Title: Comparison of the analgesic effects of xylazine in sheep via three different administration routes
Author: Grant, C.
Upton, R.
Citation: Australian Veterinary Journal, 2004; 82(5):304-307
Publisher: Australian Veterinary Assn
Issue Date: 2004
ISSN: 0005-0423
1751-0813
Abstract: Objective To examine the influence of administration route on the analgesic effects of identical doses of xylazine in sheep. Design A prospective, linear, randomised laboratory study. Procedure The analgesic response to the administration of 2.5 mg of the α2 agonist xylazine either intravenously, intramuscularly or subcutaneously was assessed using an analgesia testing method based upon a learned response to a painful electrical stimulus. Results Intravenous administration achieved the most rapid onset and highest peak analgesic values of all administration methods, but was characterised by a shorter duration of action (25 min). Intramuscular and subcutaneous administration resulted in a longer duration of action (40 min) and a greater total analgesic response. Conclusion For the routine management of acute pain, intramuscular administration provided the best combination of onset, duration and total analgesic response of the routes examined. The absence of adverse side effects, such as sedation, normally associated with the administration of α2 agonists should also encourage the use of this method as a simple and effective means of providing significant analgesia in the sheep.
Keywords: Animals; Sheep; Xylazine; Adrenergic alpha-Agonists; Pain Measurement; Injections, Intramuscular; Injections, Intravenous; Injections, Subcutaneous; Area Under Curve; Prospective Studies
Description: The definitive version is available at www.blackwell-synergy.com
RMID: 0020040449
DOI: 10.1111/j.1751-0813.2004.tb12712.x
Appears in Collections:Anaesthesia and Intensive Care publications

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