Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/59695
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Type: Journal article
Title: Soft drink consumption and mental health problems among adults in Australia
Author: Shi, Z.
Taylor, A.
Wittert, G.
Goldney, R.
Gill, T.
Citation: Public Health Nutrition, 2010; 13(7):1073-1079
Publisher: C A B I Publishing
Issue Date: 2010
ISSN: 1368-9800
1475-2727
Statement of
Responsibility: 
Zumin Shi, Anne W Taylor, Gary Wittert, Robert Goldney and Tiffany K Gill
Abstract: Objective: To examine the association between soft drink consumption and mental health problems, including self-reported doctor-diagnosed anxiety, stressrelated problem and depression, suicidal ideation and psychological distress, among adults in South Australia. Design: Data were collected using a risk factor surveillance system. Each month a representative random sample of South Australians was selected from the Electronic White Pages with interviews conducted using computer-assisted telephone interviewing. Setting: South Australia. Subjects: Participants were aged 16 years and above. Results: Among 4741 participants, 12.5% reported daily soft drink consumption of more than half a litre. High levels of soft drink consumption were positively associated with depression, stress-related problem, suicidal ideation, psychological distress and a current mental health condition, but not anxiety. Overall, 24.0% of those having suicidal ideation reported consuming more than half a litre of soft drink per day. In the multivariate analysis, after adjusting for sociodemographic and lifestyle factors, those who consumed more than half a litre of soft drink per day had approximately 60% greater risk of having depression, stress-related problem, suicidal ideation, psychological distress or a current mental health condition, compared with those not consuming soft drinks. The soft drink to total fluid consumption ratio had similar associations with mental health problems. Conclusions: There is a positive association between consumption of soft drinks and mental health problems among adults in South Australia.
Keywords: Humans; Confidence Intervals; Odds Ratio; Depression; Stress, Psychological; Anxiety; Mental Health; Mental Disorders; Confounding Factors (Epidemiology); Carbonated Beverages; Adolescent; Adult; South Australia; Female; Male; Young Adult
Rights: Copyright The Authors 2010
RMID: 0020100119
DOI: 10.1017/S1368980009993132
Appears in Collections:Medicine publications

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