Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/60379
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Type: Journal article
Title: Landmarks in the understanding and treatment of reflux disease
Author: Dent, J.
Citation: Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, 2009; 24(Supp 3):S5-S14
Publisher: Blackwell Publishing Asia
Issue Date: 2009
ISSN: 0815-9319
1440-1746
Statement of
Responsibility: 
John Dent
Abstract: The last 50 years have seen a transformation in the understanding and treatment of reflux disease. The development and wide use of flexible endoscopy and progressively more sophisticated approaches to measurement of pathophysiological factors have been major drivers of advances. The recognition and progressive elucidation of the mechanical events that comprise the transient lower esophageal sphincter relaxation and how they lead to reflux provide a novel and firm foundation for tailoring therapies that act directly to reduce occurrence of reflux episodes, either surgically or pharmacologically. Novel GABAB agonist drugs have been shown to inhibit transient relaxations and are currently being evaluated in clinical trials on patients with reflux disease. Better understanding has extended to recognition of the extraordinarily high prevalence of reflux disease and of the ability of proton pump inhibitor drugs to deliver major benefits to a high proportion of patients with reflux disease. The life of the Gastroenterological Society of Australia has spanned the period of these major advances. A large number of the members of the Society and their associates have contributed substantially to these advances.
Keywords: gastroesophageal reflux; pathophysiology; lower esophageal sphincter; diaphragmatic hiatus; history
Rights: © 2009 The Author. Journal compilation © 2009 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd
RMID: 0020092826
DOI: 10.1111/j.1440-1746.2009.06065.x
Appears in Collections:Medicine publications

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