Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/61094
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Type: Journal article
Title: Substance P antagonists as a therapeutic approach to improving outcome following traumatic brain injury
Author: Vink, R.
Van Den Heuvel, C.
Citation: Neurotherapeutics, 2010; 7(1):74-80
Publisher: American Society for Experimental Neurotherapeutics
Issue Date: 2010
ISSN: 1933-7213
1878-7479
Statement of
Responsibility: 
Robert Vink and Corinna van den Heuvel
Abstract: Although a number of secondary injury factors are known to contribute to the development of morphological injury and functional deficits following traumatic brain injury, accumulating evidence has suggested that neuropeptides, and in particular substance P, may play a critical role. Substance P is released early following acute injury to the CNS as part of a neurogenic inflammatory response. In so doing, it facilitates an increase in the permeability of the blood-brain barrier and the development of vasogenic edema. At the cellular level, substance P has been shown to directly result in neuronal cell death; functionally, substance P has been implicated in learning and memory, mood and anxiety, stress mechanisms, emotion-processing, migraine, emesis, pain, and seizures, all of which may be adversely affected after brain injury. Inhibition of post-traumatic substance P activity, either by preventing release or by antagonism of the neurokinin-1 receptor, has consistently resulted in a profound decrease in development of edema and marked improvements in functional outcome. This review summarizes the current evidence supporting a role for substance P in acute brain injury.
Keywords: Neurotrauma; inflammation; edema; substance P; tachykinins
Rights: © 2010 The American Society for Experimental NeuroTherapeutics, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
RMID: 0020100049
DOI: 10.1016/j.nurt.2009.10.018
Appears in Collections:Anatomical Sciences publications

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