Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/61557
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Type: Journal article
Title: Psychosocial treatment for methamphetamine use disorders: A preliminary randomized controlled trial of cognitive behavior therapy and acceptance and commitment therapy
Author: Smout, M.
Longo, M.
Harrison, S.
Minniti, R.
Wickes, W.
White, J.
Citation: Substance Abuse, 2010; 31(2):98-107
Publisher: The Hawthorn Medical Press
Issue Date: 2010
ISSN: 0889-7077
1547-0164
Statement of
Responsibility: 
Matthew F. Smout, Marie Longo, Sonia Harrison, Rinaldo Minniti, Wendy Wickes, Jason M. White
Abstract: Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) incorporates developments in behavior therapy, holds promise but has not been evaluated for methamphetamine use disorders. The objective of this study was to test whether ACT would increase treatment attendance and reduce methamphetamine use and related harms compared to cognitive behavior therapy (CBT). One hundred and four treatment-seeking adults with methamphetamine abuse or dependence were randomly assigned to receive 12 weekly 60-minute individual sessions of ACT or CBT. Attrition was 70% at 12 weeks and 86% at 24 weeks postentry. Per intention-to-treat analysis, there were no significant differences between the treatment groups in treatment attendance (median 3 sessions), and methamphetamine-related outcomes; however, methamphetamine use (toxicology-assessed and self-reported), negative consequences, and dependence severity significantly improved over time in both groups. Although ACT did not improve treatment outcomes or attendance compared to CBT, it may be a viable alternative to CBT for methamphetamine use disorders. Future rigorous research in this area seems warranted.
Keywords: Acceptance and Commitment Therapy; cognitive behavior therapy; methamphetamine
Rights: Copyright © Taylor & Francis Group, LLC
RMID: 0020097402
DOI: 10.1080/08897071003641578
Appears in Collections:Pharmacology publications

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