Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/63930
Type: Conference paper
Title: Understanding the internationalisation of family businesses: Lessons from the history of Chinese and Lebanese diaspora
Author: Gupta, V.
Graves, C.
Thomas, J.
Citation: Proceedings of the Second Annual Conference of Academic Association of Historians in Australian and New Zealand Business Schools (AAHANZBS), held in Sydney, New South Wales 16-17 December 2010 / Greg Patmore (ed): pp.1-27
Publisher: University of Sydney
Publisher Place: www
Issue Date: 2010
ISBN: 9781742102085
Conference Name: Annual Conference of the Academic Association of Historians in Australian and New Zealand Business Schools (2nd : 2010 : Sydney, New South Wales)
Statement of
Responsibility: 
Vipin Gupta, Chris Graves and Jill Thomas
Abstract: The emerging work on the internationalisation of the family businesses suggests that family businesses in general tend have low levels of internationalisation when compared to their non-family counterparts. Here, we review the Diaspora internationalisation history of Chinese family businesses in Southeast Asia, and of Lebanese family businesses in West Africa. The review highlights the interplay with the local varieties of capitalism, and underscores four factors in successful overseas market entry and growth of the overseas family businesses (OFBs): business strategic intent, family stewardship, direct and institution-mediating community sponsorship, and gender-centred leadership. We offer a schematic mapping of these four factors on to the four systems of family business – family, business, ownership, and gender, using Parson’s structural functionalism theory and AGIL schema Implications for further research and for the family business practitioners are discussed.
Rights: Copyright status unknown
RMID: 0020102220
Description (link): http://hdl.handle.net/2123/7057
Appears in Collections:Business School publications

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