Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/6395
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dc.contributor.authorGoldney, R.en
dc.date.issued2001en
dc.identifier.citationCrisis (Kirkland), 2001; 22(4):173-175en
dc.identifier.issn0227-5910en
dc.identifier.issn2151-2396en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2440/6395-
dc.descriptionCopyright © 2001 Hogrefe and Huberen
dc.description.abstractThere is now unequivocal statistical evidence of an association between some media portrayals of suicide and further subsequent suicide. However, it is a weak association, and it is probably of far less importance than our need to address basic principles of good mental health management. Rather than prescribe to the media how to report suicide, its potentially positive effects should be addressed.en
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityRobert D. Goldneyen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherHogrefe and Huber Publishersen
dc.subjectmass media; suicide; suicidal behavior; mental health management; suicide reportingmass media; suicide; suicidal behavior; mental health management; suicide reportingen
dc.titleThe media and suicide: A cautionary viewen
dc.typeJournal articleen
dc.identifier.rmid0020012080en
dc.identifier.doi10.1027//0227-5910.22.4.173en
dc.identifier.pubid61079-
pubs.library.collectionPsychiatry publicationsen
pubs.verification-statusVerifieden
pubs.publication-statusPublisheden
Appears in Collections:Psychiatry publications

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