Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/65812
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Type: Journal article
Title: Monoamine oxidase A variant influences antidepressant treatment response in female patients with Major Depression
Author: Domschke, K.
Hohoff, C.
Mortensen, L.
Roehrs, T.
Deckert, J.
Arolt, V.
Baune, B.
Citation: Progress in Neuro-psychopharmacology & Biological Psychiatry, 2008; 32(1):224-228
Publisher: Pergamon-Elsevier Science Ltd
Issue Date: 2008
ISSN: 0278-5846
1878-4216
Statement of
Responsibility: 
Katharina Domschke, Christa Hohoff, Lena S. Mortensen, Tilmann Roehrs, Jürgen Deckert, Volker Arolt, Bernhard T. Baune
Abstract: The monoamine oxidase A (MAO-A) has been suggested to be involved in the pathogenesis as well as the pharmacological treatment of Major Depression. In the present study, 340 patients with a Major Depressive Episode (f=194, m=146; DSM-IV) of Caucasian descent were genotyped for the functional MAO-A VNTR. The clinical response to antidepressive pharmacological treatment was assessed by weekly intra-individual changes of HAM-D-21 scores over six weeks. The longer MAO-A alleles (3a, 4, 5) conferred a significant risk of slower and less efficient overall response over the course of 6 weeks of antidepressant treatment in patients with Major Depression, with the effect being restricted to female patients (p=0.028; corrected for multiple testing). The present results suggest that high-activity MAO-A genotypes possibly by consecutively decreased serotonin and/or norepinephrine availability negatively influence antidepressant treatment response during the first six weeks of pharmacological treatment in female patients with Major Depression.
Keywords: Antidepressant treatment; Major Depression; Monoamine oxidase A; Pharmacogenetics; VNTR
Rights: © 2007 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
RMID: 0020111421
DOI: 10.1016/j.pnpbp.2007.08.011
Appears in Collections:Psychiatry publications

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