Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/65912
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Type: Journal article
Title: COMT val158met influence on electroconvulsive therapy response in major depression
Author: Domschke, K.
Zavorotnyy, M.
Diemer, J.
Nitsche, S.
Hohoff, C.
Baune, B.
Deckert, J.
Arolt, V.
Zwanzger, P.
Citation: American Journal of Medical Genetics. Part B: Neuropsychiatric Genetics, 2010; 153B(1):286-290
Publisher: Wiley-Liss
Issue Date: 2010
ISSN: 1552-4841
1552-485X
Statement of
Responsibility: 
Katharina Domschke, Maxim Zavorotnyy, Julia Diemer, Sarina Nitsche, Christa Hohoff, Bernhard T. Baune, Juergen Deckert, Volker Arolt and Peter Zwanzger
Abstract: There is strong evidence for a genetic contribution to the pathogenesis of depression, with the functional catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) val158met polymorphism having been suggested as a potential susceptibility factor. In the present study, the effect of COMT val158met on response to electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) was analyzed in a sample of 104 Caucasian patients (f = 71, m = 33) with pharmacologically treatment-resistant Major Depression. The higher active COMT 158val allele was found to be associated with (1) higher pre-ECT severity of depression and (2) better treatment response to ECT particularly regarding the core symptoms of depression as well as sleep-related symptoms. These findings were restricted to the female subgroup of patients. In summary, the present study supports a potentially gender-specific significant impact of COMT gene variation on electroconvulsive therapy response, with COMT 158val risk allele carriers suffering from more severe, pharmacologically less efficiently treatable depression and thus possibly deriving greater benefit from ECT in the first place.
Keywords: COMT; polymorphism; dopamine; ECT; pharmacogenetics; gender
Rights: Copyright © 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.
RMID: 0020111496
DOI: 10.1002/ajmg.b.30949
Appears in Collections:Psychiatry publications

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