Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/70765
Type: Conference paper
Title: Newer cars: Much safer
Author: Hutchinson, T.
Anderson, R.
Citation: Proceedings of the 34th Australasian Transport Research Forum (ATRF), 28-30 September, 2011, Adelaide: pp.1-8
Publisher: UniSA and SA Dept for Transport, Energy & Infrastructure
Publisher Place: online
Issue Date: 2011
Conference Name: Australasian Transport Research Forum (34th : 2011 : Adelaide)
Statement of
Responsibility: 
T.P. Hutchinson and R.W.G. Anderson
Abstract: Secondary safety refers to mitigation of injury given that a crash occurs, as distinct from prevention of crashes. Evidence is presented that secondary safety of new cars has been improving substantially in recent years. (a) Single-car crashes, South Australia. The later the year of the car, the smaller is the probability of the driver being killed. (b) Car-car collisions, South Australia. Comparison of the severities of injury to the two drivers in the one collision is useful because speed of the impact is the same for the two drivers. The basic question is, which driver is killed? It is shown that it is much more likely to be the driver of the older car. (c) Car-car collisions, New South Wales. The finding was replicated with NSW data. In this case, the sample size was sufficient to include the mass ratio of the cars as a covariate. In each analysis, allowance was made for some covariates. Our interpretation of these results is that recent cars genuinely have appreciably better secondary safety than older ones. Possible reasons are discussed. Our results are from a time period starting several years ago and cars are about a decade old on average. Thus we cannot be sure an improvement is continuing in new cars now: the data is not yet available. The results are nevertheless relevant to the current and future road safety situation. As older cars are scrapped, the proportion of crashes that result in car occupant death will continue to fall for at least one decade into the future.
Rights: © 2011 Univeristy of South Australia and the South Australian Department for Transport, Energy and Infrastructure
RMID: 0020116361
Appears in Collections:Centre for Automotive Safety Research conference papers

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