Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/7535
Citations
Scopus Web of Science® Altmetric
?
?
Type: Journal article
Title: Suggestion of a major gene for familial febrile convulsions mapping to 8q13-21
Author: Wallace, R.
Berkovic, S.
Howell, R.
Sutherland, G.
Mulley, J.
Citation: Journal of Medical Genetics, 1996; 33(4):308-312
Publisher: BMJ Publishing
Issue Date: 1996
ISSN: 0022-2593
1468-6244
Statement of
Responsibility: 
R H Wallace, S F Berkovic, R A Howell, G R Sutherland, J C Mulley
Abstract: Febrile convulsions affect 2 to 5% of all children under the age of 5 years. These convulsions probably have a variety of causes, but a genetic component has long been recognised. A large and remarkable family is described in which febrile convulsions appear to result from autosomal dominant inheritance at a single major locus. A gene for febrile convulsions was excluded from regions of previously mapped epilepsy genes and extension of exclusion mapping, using microsatellite markers, to the entire genome implied that a locus on chromosome 8q13-21 may be involved. Linkage analysis of markers on chromosome 8 gave a multipoint lod score of 3.40, maximised over different values of penetrance and phenocopy rate, for linkage between the gene for febrile convulsions and the region flanked by markers D8S553 and D8S279. This lod score was calculated assuming the disease has a penetrance of 60% and a phenocopy rate of 3%. Although there was no indication of linkage other than to markers on chromosome 8, linkage remains suggestive rather than significant because of the maximisation procedure applied. The support for linkage involving a major gene, as opposed to an alternative hypothesis of a complex inheritance pattern, relied upon the assumption of low penetrance.
Keywords: febrile convulsions; chromosome 8; genetic linkage
Rights: Copyright © 1996 by the BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.
RMID: 0030005511
DOI: 10.1136/jmg.33.4.308
Appears in Collections:Paediatrics publications

Files in This Item:
There are no files associated with this item.


Items in DSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.