Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/7621
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Type: Journal article
Title: Paradoxical impact of body positioning on gastroesophageal reflux and gastric emptying in the premature neonate
Author: Omari, T.
Rommel, N.
Staunton, E.
Lontis, R.
Goodchild, L.
Haslam, R.
Dent, J.
Davidson, G.
Citation: Journal of Pediatrics, 2004; 145(2):194-200
Publisher: Mosby Inc
Issue Date: 2004
ISSN: 0022-3476
1097-6833
Abstract: OBJECTIVES: To combine manometry and impedance to characterize the mechanisms of gastroesophageal reflux (GER) and to explore their relation to the rate of gastric emptying (GE) and body position. STUDY DESIGN: Ten healthy preterm infants (35 to 37 weeks' postmenstrual age) were studied with the use of a micromanometric/impedance assembly. Episodes of GER were identified by impedance, and the mechanism(s) of GER triggering and GER clearance were characterized. GE was determined with a C13Na-octanoate breath test. RESULTS: Gastroesophageal reflux episodes (n=89) were recorded, consisting of 74% liquid, 14% gas, and 12% mixed. Transient lower esophageal sphincter relaxation (TLESR) was the predominant mechanism of reflux, triggering 83% of GER. Of 92 TLESRs recorded, 27% were not associated with reflux. Infants studied in the right lateral position had significantly (P <.01) more GER, a higher proportion of liquid GER (P <.05), and faster GE (P <.005) when compared with infants studied in the left lateral position. CONCLUSIONS: In healthy preterm infants, GER is predominantly liquid in nature. Right-side positioning is associated with increased triggering of TLESR and GER despite accelerating GE.
Keywords: Humans; Gastroesophageal Reflux; Infant, Premature, Diseases; Manometry; Electric Impedance; Gastric Emptying; Posture; Time Factors; Infant, Newborn; Female; Male
RMID: 0020041794
DOI: 10.1016/j.jpeds.2004.05.026
Appears in Collections:Paediatrics publications

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