Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/76293
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Type: Journal article
Title: Pathologies of the appendix: a 10-year review of 4670 appendicectomy specimens
Author: Chandrasegaram, Manju D.
Rothwell, Lincoln Alastair
An, Ethan I.
Miller, Rose J.
Citation: Australian and New Zealand Journal of Surgery, 2012; 82(11):844-847
Publisher: Blackwell Science Asia
Issue Date: 2012
ISSN: 1445-1433
School/Discipline: School of Medical Sciences : Anatomy and Pathology
Statement of
Responsibility: 
Manju D. Chandrasegaram, Lincoln A. Rothwell, Ethan I. An and Rose J. Miller
Abstract: Background: Debate surrounds the management of the macroscopically normal appendix. Current literature recommends its removal given the high incidence of microscopic appendicitis, and other unusual pathologies in the normal-looking appendix. Negative appendicectomies are reported on the decline with increased use of diagnostic radiological adjuncts. Methods: This study analysed pathologies of the appendix over 10 years in the Pathology Department in Canberra. A positive appendicectomy was defined as acute appendicitis, faecoliths, worms, endometriosis or appendiceal tumours. We reviewed the positive appendicectomy rate over this time period. Results: There were 4670 appendicectomy specimens in 2386 males (51.1%) and 2284 (49%) females. The incidence of acute appendicitis was 71.3% and the positive appendicectomy rate was 76.3%. There were significantly fewer negative appendicectomies in males (16.8%) compared with females (31.0%). There was no appreciable change in this trend over the study period. Of the positive appendicectomies, there were 129 (3.6%) faecoliths. Of these, only 39.5% had concomitant appendicitis. There were 44 (1.2%) specimens identified with worms. Of these, 40.9% had concomitant appendicitis. There were 14 cases of endometriosis of the appendix of which 36% had concomitant appendicitis. There were 58/3562 (1.6%) appendiceal tumours within the positive appendicectomy group the majority of which were carcinoid tumours (65.5%). Conclusion: There is a higher incidence of negative appendicectomies in women compared with men, which is similar to other published studies. Faecoliths and worms are a known cause of appendiceal colic and in our series were identified mostly in the absence of histological evidence of appendicitis.
Keywords: appendicectomy; appendix; endometriosis; faecoliths; worms
Rights: © 2012 The Authors. ANZ Journal of Surgery © 2012 Royal Australasian College of Surgeons
RMID: 0020123066
DOI: 10.1111/j.1445-2197.2012.06185.x
Appears in Collections:Pathology publications

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