Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/7986
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Type: Journal article
Title: Universal antenatal group B streptococcus screening? The opinions of obstetricians and neonatologists within Australia
Author: McLaughlin, K.
Crowther, C.
Citation: Australian & New Zealand Journal of Obstetrics & Gynaecology, 2000; 40(3):338-340
Publisher: Blackwell Publishing Asia
Issue Date: 2000
ISSN: 0004-8666
1479-828X
Abstract: Group B streptococcus (GBS) is the leading infectious cause of morbidity and mortality in Australian newborns. Although intrapartum chemoprophylaxis is recommended to reduce the risk of neonatal GBS transmission and disease, controversy exists as to the best method to select women 'at risk' for this treatment. Our study aimed to survey the opinions of obstetricians and neonatologists currently in practice in Australia on GBS screening and treatment. Of the 488 obstetricians and 68 neonatologists currently in practice who responded to the survey, 271 obstetricians (56%) and 40 neonatologists (61%) supported universal antenatal screening. Of those respondents who did not support a universal antenatal screening policy, 196 (93%) and 24 (92%) of the obstetricians and neonatologists respectively, supported antenatal screening based on risk factors. This diversity in practitioner opinion highlights the lack of certainty in the literature as to the best management strategy to prevent neonatal GBS sepsis.
Keywords: Humans; Streptococcus agalactiae; Streptococcal Infections; Infant, Newborn, Diseases; Anti-Bacterial Agents; Mass Screening; Prenatal Care; Health Care Surveys; Confidence Intervals; Probability; Attitude of Health Personnel; Neonatology; Obstetrics; Pregnancy; Infant, Newborn; Physician's Practice Patterns; Australia; Female; Male
RMID: 0001000347
DOI: 10.1111/j.1479-828X.2000.tb03345.x
Appears in Collections:Obstetrics and Gynaecology publications

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