Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/8190
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Type: Journal article
Title: Maternal nutrition affects the ability of treatment with IGF-I and IGF-II to increase growth of the placenta and fetus, in guinea pigs
Author: Sohlstrom, A.
Fernberg, P.
Owens, J.
Owens, P.
Citation: Growth Hormone & IGF Research, 2001; 11(6):392-398
Publisher: Churchill Livingstone
Issue Date: 2001
ISSN: 1096-6374
1532-2238
Statement of
Responsibility: 
A. Sohlström, P. Fernberg, J. A. Owens and P. C. Owens
Abstract: The aim of this study was to investigate how administration of IGF-I and IGF-II, during early to mid pregnancy, affects maternal growth and body composition as well as fetal and placental growth, in ad libitum fed, and in moderately, chronically food restricted guinea pigs. From day 20 of gestation, mothers (3–4 months old) were infused with IGF-I, IGF-II (565 μg/day) or vehicle for 17 days and then killed on day 40 of gestation. Maternal organ weights, fetal and placental weights were assessed. Treatment with IGFs did not alter body weight gain and had small effects on body composition in the mothers. Both IGF-I and IGF-II increased fetal and placental weights in ad libitum fed dams and IGF-I increased placental weight in food restricted dams. In conclusion, treatment with IGF-I during the first half of pregnancy stimulates placental growth in both ad libitum fed and food restricted guinea pigs without affecting maternal growth while fetal growth is stimulated by IGF treatment only in ad libitum fed animals.
Keywords: Placenta; Animals; Guinea Pigs; Weight Gain; Insulin-Like Growth Factor I; Insulin-Like Growth Factor II; Organ Size; Food Deprivation; Body Composition; Embryonic and Fetal Development; Gestational Age; Pregnancy; Eating; Female; Nutritional Physiological Phenomena
RMID: 0020012403
DOI: 10.1054/ghir.2001.0253
Description (link): http://www.elsevier.com/wps/find/journaldescription.cws_home/623041/description#description
Appears in Collections:Obstetrics and Gynaecology publications
Physiology publications

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