Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/8275
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Type: Journal article
Title: Abundance of leptin mRNA in fetal adipose tissue is related to fetal body weight
Author: Yuen, B.
McMillen, I.
Symonds, M.
Owens, P.
Citation: Journal of Endocrinology, 1999; 163(3):R11-R14
Publisher: Society for Endocrinology
Issue Date: 1999
ISSN: 0022-0795
1479-6805
Statement of
Responsibility: 
B S J Yuen, I C McMillen, M E Symonds, and P C Owens
Abstract: Leptin mRNA was measured in adipose tissue of fetal sheep by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RTPCR). Abundance of leptin mRNA relative to b-actin mRNA in fetal perirenal adipose tissue increased (P<0.02) with gestation, being higher at 144 d (0.73 ± 0.10, n=5) than at 90-91 d (0.40 ± 0.08, n=6) or 125 d (0.40 ± 0.04, n=5) gestation (term ~147- 150 d). There was a positive relationship between relative abundance of leptin mRNA (y) and fetal body weight (x) between 90 and 144 d gestation (r2=0.27, P<0.01). The slope of the linear dependence of leptin mRNA on fetal weight was 15-fold greater (P<0.001) at 90-91d (y = 2.81x - 1.1, n=6, r2=0.71, P<0.025) than between 125-144 d gestation (y = 0.195x - 0.15, n=16, r2=0.39, P<0.01). Thus the leptin synthetic capacity of fetal adipose tissue appears to increase in late gestation but this is accompanied by constraint of its sensitivity to fetal body weight. We hypothesise that leptin synthesis in fetal adipose tissue is related to fetal nutrient supply and growth rate.
Keywords: Adipose Tissue; Animals; Sheep; Fetal Weight; Actins; Leptin; RNA, Messenger; Electrophoresis, Agar Gel; Polymerase Chain Reaction; Gestational Age; Female; Male
Description: First published in vol. 163 no. 1 pp. R1-R4 with incorrect author attribution.
Rights: © 1999 Society for Endocrinology
RMID: 0030080580
DOI: 10.1677/joe.0.163R011
Appears in Collections:Obstetrics and Gynaecology publications

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