Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/86828
Citations
Scopus Web of Science® Altmetric
?
?
Type: Journal article
Title: A comprehensive investigation of variants in genes encoding adiponectin (ADIPOQ) and its receptors (ADIPOR1/R2), and their association with serum adiponectin, type 2 diabetes, insulin resistance and the metabolic syndrome
Author: Peters, K.
Beilby, J.
Cadby, G.
Warrington, N.
Bruce, D.
Davis, W.
Davis, T.
Wiltshire, S.
Knuiman, M.
McQuillan, B.
Palmer, L.
Thompson, P.
Hung, J.
Citation: BMC Medical Genetics, 2013; 14(1):15-1-15-12
Publisher: BioMed Central
Issue Date: 2013
ISSN: 1471-2350
1471-2350
Statement of
Responsibility: 
Kirsten E Peters, John Beilby, Gemma Cadby, Nicole M Warrington, David G Bruce, Wendy A Davis, Timothy ME Davis, Steven Wiltshire, Matthew Knuiman, Brendan M McQuillan, Lyle J Palmer, Peter L Thompson and Joseph Hung
Abstract: Background: Low levels of serum adiponectin have been linked to central obesity, insulin resistance, metabolic syndrome, and type 2 diabetes. Variants in ADIPOQ, the gene encoding adiponectin, have been shown to influence serum adiponectin concentration, and along with variants in the adiponectin receptors (ADIPOR1 and ADIPOR2) have been implicated in metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes. This study aimed to comprehensively investigate the association of common variants in ADIPOQ, ADIPOR1 and ADIPOR2 with serum adiponectin and insulin resistance syndromes in a large cohort of European-Australian individuals. Methods: Sixty-four tagging single nucleotide polymorphisms in ADIPOQ, ADIPOR1 and ADIPOR2 were genotyped in two general population cohorts consisting of 2,355 subjects, and one cohort of 967 subjects with type 2 diabetes. The association of tagSNPs with outcomes were evaluated using linear or logistic modelling. Meta-analysis of the three cohorts was performed by random-effects modelling. Results: Meta-analysis revealed nine genotyped tagSNPs in ADIPOQ significantly associated with serum adiponectin across all cohorts after adjustment for age, gender and BMI, including rs10937273, rs12637534, rs1648707, rs16861209, rs822395, rs17366568, rs3774261, rs6444175 and rs17373414. The results of haplotype-based analyses were also consistent. Overall, the variants in the ADIPOQ gene explained <5% of the variance in serum adiponectin concentration. None of the ADIPOR1/R2 tagSNPs were associated with serum adiponectin. There was no association between any of the genetic variants and insulin resistance or metabolic syndrome. A multi-SNP genotypic risk score for ADIPOQ alleles revealed an association with 3 independent SNPs, rs12637534, rs16861209, rs17366568 and type 2 diabetes after adjusting for adiponectin levels (OR=0.86, 95% CI=(0.75, 0.99), P=0.0134). Conclusions: Genetic variation in ADIPOQ, but not its receptors, was associated with altered serum adiponectin. However, genetic variation in ADIPOQ and its receptors does not appear to contribute to the risk of insulin resistance or metabolic syndrome but did for type 2 diabetes in a European-Australian population.
Keywords: Adiponectin; ADIPOQ; ADIPOR; Type 2 diabetes; Insulin resistance and Metabolic syndrome
Rights: © Peters et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. 2013 This article is published under license to BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://​creativecommons.​org/​licenses/​by/​2.​0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
RMID: 0020136600
DOI: 10.1186/1471-2350-14-15
Grant ID: http://purl.org/au-research/grants/nhmrc/513778
Appears in Collections:Translational Health Science publications

Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormat 
hdl_86828.pdfPublished version687.12 kBAdobe PDFView/Open


Items in DSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.