Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/87706
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Type: Journal article
Title: Dyspepsia and irritable bowel syndrome in China: a population-based endoscopy study of prevalence and impact
Author: Zhao, Y.
Zou, D.
Wang, R.
Ma, X.
Yan, X.
Man, X.
Gao, L.
Fang, J.
Yan, H.
Kang, X.
Yin, P.
Hao, Y.
Li, Q.
Dent, J.
Sung, J.
Halling, K.
Wernersson, B.
Johansson, S.
He, J.
Citation: Alimentary Pharmacology and Therapeutics, 2010; 32(4):562-572
Publisher: Wiley
Issue Date: 2010
ISSN: 0269-2813
1365-2036
Statement of
Responsibility: 
Y. Zhao, D. Zou, R. Wang, X. Ma, X. Yan, X. Man, L. Gao, J. Fang, H. Yan, X. Kang, P. Yin, Y. Hao, Q. Li, J. Dent, J. Sung, K. Halling, B. Wernersson, S. Johansson, and J. He
Abstract: Background: Dyspepsia and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) are common in Western populations. Aim: To determine the epidemiology of dyspepsia and IBS in China. Methods: A representative sample of 18 000 adults from five regions of China were asked to complete the modified Rome II questionnaire; 20% were asked to complete the 36-item Short Form Health Survey (SF-36). Participants from Shanghai were invited to provide blood samples and undergo oesophagogastroduodenoscopy. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were determined using a multivariate logistic regression model. Results: The survey was completed by 16 091 individuals (response rate: 89.4%). Overall, 387 participants (2.4%) had dyspepsia and 735 (4.6%) had IBS. All SF-36 dimension scores were at least five points lower in individuals with than without dyspepsia or IBS (P ≤ 0.001). In Shanghai, 1030 (32.7%) of the 3153 respondents agreed to endoscopy; neither dyspepsia nor IBS was found to be associated with reflux oesophagitis, peptic ulcer disease or Helicobacter pylori infection. Conclusions: Prevalence estimates for dyspepsia and IBS in China are lower than in Western populations. In China, dyspepsia or IBS symptoms are generally not associated with underlying organic disease.
Keywords: No keywords specified
Rights: © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.
RMID: 0020100477
DOI: 10.1111/j.1365-2036.2010.04376.x
Appears in Collections:Medicine publications

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