Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/88627
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Type: Journal article
Title: GWAS of 126,559 individuals identifies genetic variants associated with educational attainment
Author: Rietveld, C.
Medland, S.
Derringer, J.
Yang, J.
Esko, T.
Martin, N.
Westra, H.-.J.
Shakhbazov, K.
Abdellaoui, A.
Agrawal, A.
Albrecht, E.
Alizadeh, B.
Amin, N.
Barnard, J.
Baumeister, S.
Benke, K.
Bielak, L.
Boatman, J.
Boyle, P.
Davies, G.
et al.
Citation: Science, 2013; 340(6139):1467-1471
Publisher: American Association for the Advancement of Science
Issue Date: 2013
ISSN: 0036-8075
1095-9203
Statement of
Responsibility: 
Cornelius A. Rietveld ... Lyle J. Palmer ... et al.
Abstract: A genome-wide association study (GWAS) of educational attainment was conducted in a discovery sample of 101,069 individuals and a replication sample of 25,490. Three independent single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are genome-wide significant (rs9320913, rs11584700, rs4851266), and all three replicate. Estimated effects sizes are small (coefficient of determination R2 ≈ 0.02%), approximately 1 month of schooling per allele. A linear polygenic score from all measured SNPs accounts for ≈2% of the variance in both educational attainment and cognitive function. Genes in the region of the loci have previously been associated with health, cognitive, and central nervous system phenotypes, and bioinformatics analyses suggest the involvement of the anterior caudate nucleus. These findings provide promising candidate SNPs for follow-up work, and our effect size estimates can anchor power analyses in social-science genetics.
Keywords: LifeLines Cohort Study; Humans; Cognition; Multifactorial Inheritance; Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide; Educational Status; Female; Male; Genome-Wide Association Study; Genetic Loci; Endophenotypes
RMID: 0020137921
DOI: 10.1126/science.1235488
Appears in Collections:Translational Health Science publications

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