Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/90251
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Type: Book chapter
Title: Kane & Edgar: playing with age in film
Author: Michell, D.
Tonkin, C.
Eate, P.
Citation: Ageing, popular culture and contemporary feminism: Harleys and hormones, 2014 / Whelehan, I., Gwynne, J. (ed./s), Ch.14, pp.219-232
Publisher: Palgrave MacMillan
Publisher Place: Houndmills, Hampshire, UK
Issue Date: 2014
ISBN: 113737652X
9781137376527
Statement of
Responsibility: 
Dee Michell, Casey Tonkin and Penelope Eate
Abstract: In this chapter we explore how perspectives on age and ageing are shaped and reveals through film. Our investigation is guided by the central question: What does it mean that some films use technology in order to convey ageing while others mask age. What are the gendered implications for men and women when ageing is represented in film? We begin with a brief overview of both Citizen Kane and J Edgar, and then move into explorations of the mother blaming and ageism we contend are at the heart of them. We use ‘mother blaming’ to describe the common practice of mothers being made accountable for their children’s behaviour even well into their adult years and without regard to the social, political, economic and cultural milieu of the family. By ageism we mean a type of prejudice or discrimination of a group of people based on their age. ‘Aging technology’ is a term we are coining to cover the multiple ways in which the age of an actor is manipulated, for example, by the use of latex.
Rights: Individual chapters © Contributors 2014. All rights reserved. No portion of this publication may be reproduced, copied or transmitted save with written permission.
RMID: 0030025569
DOI: 10.1057/9781137376534
Published version: https://www.palgrave.com/gp/book/9781137376527
Appears in Collections:Gender Studies and Social Analysis publications

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