Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/91709
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dc.contributor.authorDabrow Woods, A.en
dc.contributor.authorGiometti, R.en
dc.contributor.authorWeeks, S.en
dc.date.issued2014en
dc.identifier.citationJBI Database of Systematic Reviews and Implementation Reports, 2014; 12(1):74-89en
dc.identifier.issn2202-4433en
dc.identifier.issn2202-4433en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2440/91709-
dc.description.abstractReview question/objective - In adult intensive care unit patients experiencing alcohol withdrawal, does the use of dexmedetomidine as an adjuvant to benzodiazepine-based therapy decrease delirium severity more effectively than benzodiazepine-based therapy alone? The objective of the systematic review is to examine the best available evidence of the clinical effectiveness of dexmedetomidine as an adjuvant to benzodiazepine-based therapy versus benzodiazepine-based therapy alone, in decreasing delirium severity associated with alcohol withdrawal in adult intensive care unit patients over the age of 18 years.en
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityAnne Dabrow Woods, Renee Giometti, Susan Weeksen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherJoanna Briggs Instituteen
dc.rightsCopyright status unknownen
dc.subjectalcohol withdrawal syndrome; benzodiazepine-based therapy; delirium; dexmedetomidine; intensive care uniten
dc.titleThe use of dexmedetomidine as an adjuvant to benzodiazepine-based therapy to decrease the severity of delirium in alcohol withdrawal in adult intensive care unit patients: a systematic review protocolen
dc.typeJournal articleen
dc.identifier.rmid0030024518en
dc.identifier.doi10.11124/jbisrir-2014-1285en
dc.identifier.pubid177598-
pubs.library.collectionTranslational Health Science publicationsen
pubs.library.teamDS03en
pubs.verification-statusVerifieden
pubs.publication-statusPublisheden
Appears in Collections:Translational Health Science publications

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